U.S. EPA Contaminated Site Cleanup Information (CLU-IN)


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division

Training & Events

Upcoming Internet Seminars
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CLU-IN's ongoing series of Internet Seminars are free, web-based slide presentations with a companion audio portion. We provide two options for accessing the audio portion of the seminar: by phone line or streaming audio simulcast. More information and registration for all Internet Seminars is available by selecting the individual seminar below. Not able to make one of our live offerings? You may also view archived seminars.

 
 
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Download seminar information in iCalendar formatITRC Biofuels: Release Prevention, ...

Biofuels: Release Prevention, Environmental Behavior, and Remediation
 
 
 
 
 

NARPM Presents...Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions

This session is designed to assist RPMs, EPA technical support staff, and states in understanding EPA's new guidance for evaluating remedial action completion for groundwater restoration projects. The training will be based on the "Guidance for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Action," November 2013; "Recommended Approach for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions," August 2014; and the Groundwater Statistical Tool, August 2014.

This training will assist participants in understanding how groundwater contaminant well data and site-specific conditions may be evaluated to assess whether restoration of a contaminated aquifer is complete. By taking this webinar, participants will achieve the following objectives:
  • Understand EPA's recommendations for determining if a groundwater restoration remedial action is complete;
  • Understand recommendations for evaluating contaminant of concern concentration levels on a well-by-well basis;
  • Be exposed to the groundwater statistics tool and understand how it may be used to evaluate well-specific data; and
  • Understand how well-specific conclusions may be used to make a determination that the restoration remedial action is complete.

NARPM Presents...Exploring Recreational and Educational Opportunities at the Picayune Wood Treating Site

Three major ways that EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) Technology Innovation and Field Services Division (TIFSD) provides technical assistance for ecological revitalization and reuse of sites is through information exchange in "Eco-Forums", reuse planning and an educational eco-curriculum. These tools and support are done through interagency agreements, at a regional level, and directly with site stakeholders. This webinar will discuss the eco-curriculum framework that was developed to help integrate the scientific aspects of cleanup and remedial components into a curriculum for local schools and will look in-depth at the TIFSD eco-curriculum pilot project at the Picayune Wood Treating Superfund Site in Mississippi, Region 4.

NARPM Presents...ICs in Decision Documents

Join in this seminar to learn about effective documentation of Institutional Controls (ICs) in Superfund decision documents. This webinar will help Remedial Project Managers (RPMs) and IC Coordinators better understand the specific requirements for formally documenting ICs in Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD), Record of Decision (ROD) Amendments, and RODs. Participants will hear both the regional and headquarters' perspective on the appropriate use of ICs in remedy decisions, as well as be provided with site-specific examples. The presenters will identify the expectations of the NCP, as well as explore additional policy and guidance to assist RPMs in documenting ICs. Finally, participants will understand how properly documented ICs can help ensure meaningful public involvement as well as facilitate the development of the Institutional Control Implementation and Assurance Plans (ICIAPs).

NARPM Presents...Interactions between Superfund and RCRA - Case Studies and Review

The interface between RCRA and Superfund is diverse, whether it is waste analysis and disposal or an adjacent RCRA Corrective Action site with co-mingling plumes. The goal of this webinar is to inform Superfund RPMs, and others, of the RCRA process be it regulation, guidance or personal interactions between the programs. Case Studies from Superfund RPMs and RCRA Corrective Action PMs will provide real world examples of this interaction. In addition, a high-level overview of RCRA is provided to set up each case study example.

Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation - Session I - Introduction to Porewater, Bioavailability, and PSDs

This is the first session of the Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation seminar series. This session is titled: Introduction to Porewater, Bioavailability, and PSDs. NARPM Presents and Risk e-Learning are offering a four-part webinar series to help you understand why, how, and when to measure porewater concentrations and bioavailability as part of contaminated sediment assessment and management. Hosted jointly by the EPA Contaminated Sediments Forum and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s Superfund Research Program, this webinar series will also focus on the use of passive sampling devices (PSD) and what they tell us about contaminant bioavailability. Previously held as a course at the National Association for Remedial Project Managers (NARPM) Training Program meeting, the webinar series features experts in the field of porewater and bioavailability and includes lectures and case studies, including practical tips to maximize the utility of porewater and bioavailability measurements. Presenters will explain the basics of chemical fate, transport, and uptake, with a focus on porewater as a key route of exposure and a strong indicator of bioavailability. PSDs are a promising technology for measuring porewater concentrations and assessing bioavailability, particularly for common sediment contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxin-like compounds. The webinar series will include information about direct measurements of porewater, such as centrifuging sediment samples or Henry Samplers, which may also be used and are particularly useful for measuring metals.

Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation - Session II - PSDs for Organic Contaminants

This is the second session of the Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation seminar series. This session is titled: PSDs for Organic Contaminants. NARPM Presents and Risk e-Learning are offering a four-part webinar series to help you understand why, how, and when to measure porewater concentrations and bioavailability as part of contaminated sediment assessment and management. Hosted jointly by the EPA Contaminated Sediments Forum and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s Superfund Research Program, this webinar series will also focus on the use of passive sampling devices (PSD) and what they tell us about contaminant bioavailability. Previously held as a course at the National Association for Remedial Project Managers (NARPM) Training Program meeting, the webinar series features experts in the field of porewater and bioavailability and includes lectures and case studies, including practical tips to maximize the utility of porewater and bioavailability measurements. Presenters will explain the basics of chemical fate, transport, and uptake, with a focus on porewater as a key route of exposure and a strong indicator of bioavailability. PSDs are a promising technology for measuring porewater concentrations and assessing bioavailability, particularly for common sediment contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxin-like compounds. The webinar series will include information about direct measurements of porewater, such as centrifuging sediment samples or Henry Samplers, which may also be used and are particularly useful for measuring metals.

Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation - Session IV - Case Studies: PSDs for Organic Contaminants

This is the fourth session of the Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation seminar series. This session is titled Case Studies: PSDs for Organic Contaminants. NARPM Presents and Risk e-Learning are offering a four-part webinar series to help you understand why, how, and when to measure porewater concentrations and bioavailability as part of contaminated sediment assessment and management. Hosted jointly by the EPA Contaminated Sediments Forum and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s Superfund Research Program, this webinar series will also focus on the use of passive sampling devices (PSD) and what they tell us about contaminant bioavailability. Previously held as a course at the National Association for Remedial Project Managers (NARPM) Training Program meeting, the webinar series features experts in the field of porewater and bioavailability and includes lectures and case studies, including practical tips to maximize the utility of porewater and bioavailability measurements. Presenters will explain the basics of chemical fate, transport, and uptake, with a focus on porewater as a key route of exposure and a strong indicator of bioavailability. PSDs are a promising technology for measuring porewater concentrations and assessing bioavailability, particularly for common sediment contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxin-like compounds. The webinar series will include information about direct measurements of porewater, such as centrifuging sediment samples or Henry Samplers, which may also be used and are particularly useful for measuring metals.

Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation - Session III - Metals and PSDs

This is the third session of the Porewater Concentrations and Bioavailability: How You Can Measure Them and Why They Influence Contaminated Sediment Remediation seminar series. This session is titled: Metals and PSDs. NARPM Presents and Risk e-Learning are offering a four-part webinar series to help you understand why, how, and when to measure porewater concentrations and bioavailability as part of contaminated sediment assessment and management. Hosted jointly by the EPA Contaminated Sediments Forum and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science’s Superfund Research Program, this webinar series will also focus on the use of passive sampling devices (PSD) and what they tell us about contaminant bioavailability. Previously held as a course at the National Association for Remedial Project Managers (NARPM) Training Program meeting, the webinar series features experts in the field of porewater and bioavailability and includes lectures and case studies, including practical tips to maximize the utility of porewater and bioavailability measurements. Presenters will explain the basics of chemical fate, transport, and uptake, with a focus on porewater as a key route of exposure and a strong indicator of bioavailability. PSDs are a promising technology for measuring porewater concentrations and assessing bioavailability, particularly for common sediment contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxin-like compounds. The webinar series will include information about direct measurements of porewater, such as centrifuging sediment samples or Henry Samplers, which may also be used and are particularly useful for measuring metals.

Remedial Action Framework (RAF): Overview of Remedial Action Framework (RAF)

USEPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation and the Office of Acquisition Management will host this webinar on the new Remedial Action Framework (RAF). The primary purpose of the contracts awarded under the Remedial Acquisition Framework will be to provide national support through multiple award contracts to the EPA remedial program and its responsibilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); the Superfund Act of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA); and the Robert T. Stafford Natural Disaster Act pursuant to the Federal Response Plan (FRP) and other laws. This webinar will provide a general overview of the RAF and will clarify to the contractor community the three suites of contracts under the RAF umbrella:
  • Design and Engineering Services (DES);
  • Remediation Environmental Services (RES); and
  • Environmental Services and Operations (ESO).

Estimating Environmental Footprints Using SEFA (Spreadsheets for Environmental Footprint Analysis)

In 2012, the EPA released the "Methodology for Understanding and Reducing a Project's Environmental Footprint," which presents green remediation metrics associated with contaminated site cleanup and a process to quantify those metrics in order to achieve a greener cleanup. In conjunction with the Methodology, the EPA developed a set of analytical workbooks known as "SEFA" (Spreadsheets for Environmental Footprint Analysis), which can be used to quantify the environmental footprint of a site cleanup. An August 2014 update to the workbooks now offers greater consolidation of data entry, greater flexibility for specifying site-specific parameters, new charts and graphics for presenting results, and expanded user instructions.

This 2-hour internet seminar will provide an overview of SEFA, demonstrate how to use the workbooks, and highlight the updated features. Opportunities will be provided throughout the seminar for participants to submit questions and observations regarding SEFA. Prior to attending this seminar, participants are strongly requested to: (1) read the Methodology or the introductory fact sheet (PDF), and (2) download and review the updated SEFA workbooks.

Managing Contaminants in Urban Vegetable Gardens to Minimize Human Exposure

The following topics will be presented:

Common Contaminants and Human Exposure Risks of Urban Gardening. This presentation will provide an overview of common contaminants found in urban soils, plant uptake of contaminants and bioavailability and human exposure risks.

Using Soil Amendments to Reduce Human Exposure to Contaminants. This presentation will also explore the efficacy of using soil amendments in vegetable gardens to reduce food-chain transfer and bioaccessibility of contaminants.

Gardening at Brownfield Sites. The results from a series of test sites across the country will be shared to highlight key findings on using soil amendments to minimize exposure to contaminants. Best practices will be also discussed.

Overview of New EPA Superfund Groundwater Guidance and Tools

Groundwater remediation is a component of more than 90 percent of active Superfund sites and achieving remedial action objectives can take years or even decades. Collectively federal agencies, states and potentially responsible parties (PRPs) spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year to address contaminated groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater, the challenges and costs associated with groundwater remedies, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently issued a new suite of guidance and tools to help focus resources on the information and decisions needed to effectively complete groundwater remedies and to ensure that these remedies protect human health and the environment. This 1 hour webinar will describe the benefits and utility of the following recently issued EPA guidance and tools:

  • Guidance for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Actions (Nov. 2013)
  • Groundwater Remedy Completion Strategy (May 2014)
  • Recommended Approach for Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions at a Groundwater Monitoring Well (Aug. 2014)
  • Groundwater Statistical Tool (Aug. 2014)

The above EPA groundwater guidance and other resources are available on EPA's website at http://www.epa.gov/superfund/health/conmedia/gwdocs/.

Participants may also be interested in the webinar on Evaluating Completion of Groundwater Restoration Remedial Actions on November 12, 2014, 1:00PM-3:00PM, EDT (18:00-20:00 GMT).

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council
Seminars Sponsored by the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council


Biofuels: Release Prevention, Environmental Behavior, and Remediation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Biofuels and biofuel blends are a new category of transportation fuels and are defined as liquid fuels and blending components produced from renewable biomass feedstocks used as alternative or supplemental fuels for internal combustion engines. Their manufacture and consumption are increasing, in part, due to usage mandates and incentives both in the United States and abroad. This expanded use of biofuel and biofuel blends increases the potential frequency of releases due to increased manufacture, transportation, storage, and distribution. Because biofuels differ from conventional fuels with respect to their physical, chemical, and biological properties, their introduction poses challenges with respect to understanding the potential impacts of releases to the environment. Specifically, once released into the environment, these fuels will exhibit different environmental behaviors as compared to conventional fuels.

This training, which is based on the ITRC's Biofuels: Release Prevention, Environmental Behavior, and Remediation (Biofuels-1, 2011), focuses on the differences between biofuels and conventional fuels specific to release scenarios, environmental impacts, characterization, and remediation. The trainers will define the scope of the potential environmental challenges by introducing biofuel fundamentals, regulatory status, and future usage projections. Participants will learn how and when to use the ITRC biofuels guidance document for their projects. They will understand the differences in biofuel and petroleum behavior; become familiar with the biofuel supply chain, potential release scenarios and release prevention; be able to develop an appropriate conceptual model for the investigation and remediation of biofuels; and select appropriate investigation and remediation strategies.

Green & Sustainable Remediation

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council The ultimate goal of remediation systems is to protect human health and the environment from contaminants. Historically, remedies have been implemented without consideration of green or sustainable concepts in order to meet this goal. This includes the potential for transferring impacts to other media. For instance, many remedial decisions do not assess greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy usage, or community engagement factors prior to the investigation or remedy implementation. Considering these factors throughout the investigation and remedy implementation process may lessen negative effects of the overall cleanup impact while the remediation remains protective of human health and the environment. The consideration of these factors is Green and Sustainable Remediation (GSR) - the site-specific employment of products, processes, technologies, and procedures that mitigate contaminant risk to receptors while making decisions that are cognizant of balancing community goals, economic impacts, and net environmental effects.

Many state and federal agencies are just beginning to assess and apply green and sustainable remediation into their regulatory programs. This training provides background on GSR concepts, a scalable and flexible framework and metrics, tools and resources to conduct GSR evaluations on remedial projects. The training is based on the ITRC's Technical & Regulatory Guidance Document: Green and Sustainable Remediation: A Practical Framework (GSR-2, 2011) as well as ITRC's Overview Document, Green and Sustainable Remediation: State of the Science and Practice (GSR-1, 2011).

Beyond basic GSR principles and definitions, participants will learn the potential benefits of incorporating GSR into their projects; when and how to incorporate GSR within a project's life cycle; and how to perform a GSR evaluation using appropriate tools. In addition, a variety of case studies will demonstrate the application of GSR and the results. The training course provides an important primer for both organizations initiating GSR programs as well as those organizations seeking to incorporate GSR considerations into existing regulatory guidance.

Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret, and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that approximately 10 percent (over a billion cubic yards) of the sediment underlying our nation's surface water is sufficiently contaminated with pollutants to pose potential risks to fish and to humans and wildlife that eat fish. Based on current average costs for managing contaminated sediments, this volume of material could cost several trillion dollars to dredge. Methods to assess the potential effect of sediment contamination on human or ecological health are historically based on total contaminant concentrations in the bulk sediment. However, research conducted over the past fifteen years has shown that the bioavailability of many of these contaminants to receptors is much less than the total amount of contaminant in the sediment. "Bioavailability processes," as defined by the National Research Council, are the "individual physical, chemical, and biological interactions that determine the exposure of plants and animals to chemicals associated with soils and sediments." Only the bioavailable fraction of an environmental contaminant may be taken up and subsequently result in an effect on an organism. Incorporating bioavailability considerations in the calculation of risk can optimize the extent of cleanup required to be protective, improve site decision-making, and can be an important factor in balancing the risks caused by remedial action with the risks addressed by remedial action.

ITRC's web-based Technical and Regulatory Guidance, Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites (CS-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training are intended to assist state regulators and practitioners with understanding and incorporating fundamental concepts of bioavailability in contaminated sediment management practices. This guidance and training describe how bioavailability considerations can be used to evaluate exposure at contaminated sediment sites, the mechanisms affecting contaminant bioavailability, available tools used to assess bioavailability, the proper application of those tools, and how bioavailability information can be incorporated into risk-management decisions. This guidance and training also contain summaries of case studies where bioavailability has been assessed and considered in the contaminated sediment remedial decision making process. This guidance and training provide insight on how bioavailability assessments can be used to understand, mitigate, and manage risk at a contaminated sediment site, often at a reduced overall project cost.

The intended users of this guidance and training participants are individuals who have a working knowledge of contaminated sediment management but seek additional information about bioavailability. Prior to the training class, participants are encouraged to review the following documents:

Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council The sediments underlying many of our nation’s major waterways are contaminated with toxic pollutants from past industrial activities. Cleaning up contaminated sediments is expensive and technically-challenging. Sediment sites are unique, complex, and require a multidisciplinary approach and often project managers lack sediments experience. ITRC developed the technical and regulatory guidance, Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments (CS-2, 2014), to assist decision-makers in identifying which contaminated sediment management technology is most favorable based on an evaluation of site specific physical, sediment, contaminant, and land and waterway use characteristics. The document provides a remedial selection framework to help identify favorable technologies, and identifies additional factors (feasibility, cost, stakeholder concerns, and others) that need to be considered as part of the remedy selection process. This ITRC training course supports participants with applying the technical and regulatory guidance as a tool to overcome the remedial challenges posed by contaminated sediment sites. Participants learn how to:
  • Identify site-specific characteristics and data needed for site decision making
  • Evaluate potential technologies based on site information
  • Select the most favorable contaminant management technology for their site
For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, Framework for Sediment Remedy Evaluation. It is available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/ContSedRem/ITRC-SedimentRemedyEvaluation.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites Website (CS-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training that assists state regulators and practitioners with understanding and incorporating fundamental concepts of bioavailability in contaminated sediment management practices.

Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge

Interstate Technology Regulatory Council Most decisions at groundwater contamination sites are driven by measurements of contaminant concentration -- snapshots of contaminant concentrations that may appear to be relatively stable or show notable changes over time. Decisions can be improved by considering mass flux and mass discharge. Mass flux and mass discharge quantify the source or plume strength at a given time and location resulting in better-informed management decisions regarding site prioritization or remedial design as well as lead to significant improvements in remediation efficiency and faster cleanup times. The use of mass flux and mass discharge is increasing and will accelerate as field methods improve and practitioners and regulators become familiar with its application, advantages, and limitations. The decision to collect and evaluate mass flux data is site-specific. It should consider the reliability of other available data, the uncertainty associated with mass flux measurements, the specific applications of the mass flux data, and the cost-benefit of collecting mass measurements.

The ITRC technology overview, Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge (MASSFLUX-1, 2010), and associated Internet-based training provide a description of the underlying concepts, potential applications, description of methods for measuring and calculating, and case studies of the uses of mass flux and mass discharge. This Technology Overview, and associated internet based training are intended to foster the appropriate understanding and application of mass flux and mass discharge estimates, and provide examples of use and analysis. The document and training assumes the participant has a general understanding of hydrogeology, the movement of chemicals in porous media, remediation technologies, and the overall remedial process. Practitioners, regulators, and others working on groundwater sites should attend this training course to learn more about various methods and potential use of mass flux and mass discharge information.
The Training Exchange (Trainex)

The Training Exchange website (Trainex) is designed to provide a wide range of training information to EPA, other federal agency, state, tribal, and local staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Trainex focuses on free training directed to federal and state staff. This site includes training schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.

EPA works in partnership with organizations, such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), and other agencies, such as the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), to offer training relevant to hazardous waste remediation, site characterization, risk assessment, emergency response, site/incident management, counter-terrorism, and the community's role in site management and cleanup.

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